Sun Exposure

Appetite and Sun Exposure Links According to New Study

A new study suggests that the amount of time spent outdoors can have an effect on appetite. The study, published in the journal PLOS One, involved 3,000 men and women who were exposed to UVB rays for 25 minutes a day. The researchers found that the UVB rays increased appetite in males and decreased it in females.

Researchers at the Institute for Diabetes and Obesity in Germany conducted the study. They analyzed data collected from an Israeli health survey and concluded that exposure to the sun increases appetite in men. The results also suggested that men eat 15 percent more calories during the summer months than they do during the winter, which is likely related to the increased sun exposure.

While UVB rays from the sun cause skin damage and increased skin cancer, they also stimulate a hormone that increases appetite in men. This hormone is responsible for the regulation of energy, appetite, and muscle strength. Men with a higher ghrelin level have higher caloric intake, according to the study. However, there are some caveats to this finding. The researchers believe that the link between sun exposure and appetite is not yet fully understood.

The findings suggest that exposure to UVB light may influence appetite in humans, but the study is difficult to draw conclusions about how the sun affects human behavior. It remains unclear whether or not sun exposure is a cause or effect of appetite in humans, but this study is the first study to demonstrate that exposure to UVB light may affect appetite in males.